Latin America and the Caribbean

60 Members

Membership: TAI Latin America and the Caribbean include non-governmental organizations and individuals from (X) LAC countries. TAI LAC is represented in the Core Team by Daniel Barragán from Centro Ecuatoriano de Derecho Ambiental – CEDA; Tomas Severino and Olimpia Castillo Blanco from Cultura Ecologica

TAI partners:

  • Conduct evidence based assessments to evaluate the implementation of access rights in their own countries
  • Conduct advocacy on the new Latin America and Caribbean Principle 10 Declaration and negotiations for a regional instrument for the region
  • Work in their own countries at the national level for improvement of laws and practice
  • Use access rights in their work.
  • Work regionally to promote access rights in other countries.

 

Goals: Current goals of TAI Latin America and the Caribbean partners are ensuring the Latin America and Caribbean Declaration on Principle 10 is followed up with political commitment from countries in the region to work to reform and improve transparency, public participation and access to justice (called access rights) in the passage of a regional convention. TAI partners have played a large role in providing input to the development of the regional instrument including making submissions on both the procedure and substantive requirements of a new convention.

Regional standards for Environmental Democracy

Latin American and the Caribbean is the first region outside of Europe to work on the creation of a regional instrument to improve access rights following the passage of a. Declaration on Principle 10 in Latin America and the Caribbean at the Rio +20 Conference in Brazil.

Ten Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Jamaica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Mexico, and Uruguay, signed the 2012 Declaration on the application of Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (“the LAC Declaration on Principle 10”) at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in June 2012. Signatories to the Declaration agreed to support the development of a regional instrument ranging from guidelines, workshops and best practices, to a regional convention which will strengthen access to information, encourage public participation, and strengthen access to justice in sustainable development decision‐making.

LAC partners seek to promote an agreement that is ambitious, achievable, and accountable, reflecting the input of experts from civil society throughout the region, in partnership with the larger public.A legally binding convention will:

  • Provide one of the most efficient and effective means of accelerating implementation as demonstrated by European Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation, and Access to Justice (regional convention for the UN Economic Commission for Europe).
  • Promote and strengthen access rights, as well as drive innovation in the development of national legislation and practice.
  • Provide a powerful lever for vulnerable populations to obtain a voice and seat at the table to address the protection and sustainable use of natural resources push for better environmental and human health and protection safeguards
  • Prevent conflicts and avoiding negative impacts on those most vulnerable.

Assessments: TAI assessments have been conducted in 15 different countries, including Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, México, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela, and three states in México: Baja California, Chiapas and Jalisco. An Adaptation Governance Assessment was conducted in St. Lucia and Trinidad and Tobago. While poverty assessments were conducted in Ecuador and Paraguay. Environmental Democracy Index Assessment have been carried out in 23 countries.

A regional LAC assessment was carried out in XYZ which evaluated the deficiencies in implementation of legal commitments by countries.

Regional standards for Environmental Democracy

Latin American and the Caribbean is the first region outside of Europe to work on the creation of a regional instrument to improve access rights following the passage of a. Declaration on Principle 10 in Latin America and the Caribbean at the Rio +20 Conference in Brazil.

Ten Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Jamaica, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Mexico, and Uruguay, signed the 2012 Declaration on the application of Principle 10 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean (“the LAC Declaration on Principle 10”) at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in June 2012. Signatories to the Declaration agreed to support the development of a regional instrument ranging from guidelines, workshops and best practices, to a regional convention which will strengthen access to information, encourage public participation, and strengthen access to justice in sustainable development decision‐making.

LAC partners seek to promote an agreement that is ambitious, achievable, and accountable, reflecting the input of experts from civil society throughout the region, in partnership with the larger public.A legally binding convention will:

  • Provide one of the most efficient and effective means of accelerating implementation as demonstrated by European Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation, and Access to Justice (regional convention for the UN Economic Commission for Europe).
  • Promote and strengthen access rights, as well as drive innovation in the development of national legislation and practice.
  • Provide a powerful lever for vulnerable populations to obtain a voice and seat at the table to address the protection and sustainable use of natural resources push for better environmental and human health and protection safeguards
  • Prevent conflicts and avoiding negative impacts on those most vulnerable.

Regional Core Team Leads